CRUSHED REVIEW: Tailing Glove

THE TAILING GLOVE

*Crushed Reviews are called that because we aren’t necessarily nice when we use, even abuse gear for a review.  These reviews are for boys and girls who are serious about their gear and don’t want to waste money on a product and then not have it live up to their expectations.  So we get them dirty, use them and see if they live up to our high expectations.  

It is hard to look at a photo from the Great Lakes Region (esp. Salmon River in NY) and not see a fish being held with a tailing glove.  These gloves are made of netting material and have a cute little lanyard attached so you don’t float it down the stream every time you struggle to put it on while fighting a big fish.  Orvis sells them.  You can also pick up cheaper (though not cheap when you consider the materials used in their simplistic craftsmanship)  overseas made tailing nets at local fishing shops around rivers where you might need them. 

Here is the review: 

To be honest (because that’s what a “Crushed Review” is all about), they are a little trendy in NY.  I wasn’t sure why because quite frankly I don’t like the way they look.  But I also don’t like carrying a huge net to a stream and I don’t like waiting for someone to crash their way downstream to net a fish for me (we usually take less nets than people).    So on a recent trip to Pulaski for steelhead I picked one up in a shop called Fat Nancy’s.

  • They are made out of net material and some canvas with a lanyard.  They won’t last you forever. Which is okay because you probably will only spend 20-30 bucks for one. Or you could just make one.
  • These gloves grab and hold fish and they do it well.
  • They are also safer for the fish than other options. These gloves allow you to hold the fish for photos and release with a much less chance of dropping and injuring the fish. You don’t have to slip a finger into the gill area to hold a bigger fish for the photo. You can also release the fish easier.  
  • It does take some wise playing to get the fish in a landable spot.  For me this presents a challenge that I like.  I prefer it wrestling with a huge net or having a buddy ice skate over rocks and through current risking his life for you to use the huge net for you.  
  • There are still certain situations where I would prefer to use a net.  Tough current being one.  Overcrowded spots being another.
  • It can be awkward to slide on especially if you start with it in an awkward spot.  I would imagine some people loose fish trying to find their glove.   If you stay calm this shouldn’t be an issue and worry about the glove when you are actually ready to use it. 
  • They freaking smell.  It only takes one fish and your landing net will carry the olfactory memory of it for you for a while, which is cool on the ride home when it reminds you of the beast you fooled.  It is not cool when it goes through the wash and still smells like fish, or when you leave it in your gear bag and now the whole basement smells a little fishy. Also, if you send it through the wash with your kids clothes your wife might murder you so be careful about that as well. 
  • It is possible to just grab the fish by the tail without the glove.  Plenty of people do it.  I have done it.  This glove just makes that easier.


In conclusion: Buy one or make one. Take it to the stream with you.  Hide it if you think it looks ridiculous, but also take a net if you have a group of guys who are willing to take turns carrying it.  Few things would be worse than playing a huge and smart fish in some tough water and loosing it because you were trying to grab its tail and couldn’t.

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